Bank Swallow

Hey guys, welcome back. Today, the only swallow species I've seen (to date) that I've only seen in Ohio; the bank swallow. Like all swallows, the bank swallow is a fast, agile, and very aerobatic flier. This can make trying to ID one in flight rather difficult. I hadn't yet moved back to Ohio, but... Continue Reading →

Olive-sided Flycatcher

Hey guys, welcome back. Ahhh, the world of flycatchers. I've said it before, and I'll say it again, flycatchers are tricky. Luckily, today's flycatcher is one of the easier ones to ID. The olive-sided flycatcher most closely resembles the wood-pewee, and is actually the largest member of the pewee family. They are mostly gray birds,... Continue Reading →

Common Nighthawk

Hey guys, welcome back. Last time, we did a swallow, and I said today's bird would share some things with swallows. Well, that's true. The common nighthawk has long, pointed wings, and hunts for insects in the air just like swallows. But that's about where the similarities end. Nighthawks are in the nightjar family, along... Continue Reading →

Purple Martin

Hey guys, welcome back. Today we have the largest member of the swallow family in North America, the purple martin! Perhaps best known as residents of bird condos throughout the US, the gourd shaped nest houses have recently begun to replace traditional style bird condos. Actually, the gourd style isn't new. Native Americans used hollowed... Continue Reading →

Bay-breasted Warbler

Hey guys, welcome back! Today is a warbler that is unique in its appearance, making it one of the easiest to ID....in spring that is. Fall is a whole other story. In spring, the bay-breasted is a unique mix of gray, black, cream, and red-brown. No other warbler shares a color scheme like this. In... Continue Reading →

Solitary Sandpiper

Hey guys, welcome back. Back to shorebirds today for the solitary sandpiper. As its name suggests, the solitary sandpiper is often seen alone. They are a medium-sized shorebird, about the size of a robin, but taller. They sport a distinctive eye-ring, have an olive-brown head and upperparts, with some mottling of white, and have a... Continue Reading →

Blackburnian Warbler

Hey guys, welcome back. Today a truly awesome looking bird, the blackburnian warbler. An eastern warbler, the blackburnian is found pretty much only in the eastern half of the US during migration. They only breed in the northeast, and the upper elevations of the Appalachians. As well as southeastern Canada. Their backs are black and... Continue Reading →

Yellow-throated Vireo

Hey guys welcome back. Today we have another vireo species; the yellow-throated vireo. The yellow-throated vireo is pretty typical of a vireo species. They're warbler-like, but slightly large, and slightly slower. The yellow-throated is a mostly gray bird with darker gray wings, and a white wing bar. They have a dark yellow head, and a... Continue Reading →

Great Cormorant

Hey guys, welcome back. Today is the great cormorant, our second cormorant species. Great cormorants look similar to the more abundant double-crested variety, but are noticeably larger and bulkier looking. They have a white patch at the base of their bill, and a white patch on their flanks, under the wing that's typically only visible... Continue Reading →

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