Orchard Oriole

Hey guys, welcome back! Today is our second oriole species. The orchard oriole is the smallest of the North American orioles (which incidentally aren't related to the orioles of Eurasia.) The male looks nearly identical to the Baltimore oriole, except its bright orange is swapped out with a dark rusty color similar to the breast... Continue Reading →

Glaucous Gull

Hey guys, welcome back. Today, a massive gull; the glaucous gull. While we did the largest gull species in the world some time back, the glaucous is a very very close second. In fact, while the great black-backed gull is on average larger, occasional individual glaucous gulls can get bigger. The glaucous gull is on... Continue Reading →

Lincoln’s Sparrow

Hey guys, welcome back. Today we have another stripey little sparrow, the Lincoln's sparrow. This streaky sparrow has thin streaking on its face, throat, and breast but little to none on its belly. When compared to the song sparrow, I think of the streaks like this; the song sparrow's streaks are made with a crayon,... Continue Reading →

Clapper Rail

Hey guys, welcome back. Today is the next rail of this series; the clapper rail. Rails are secretive wading birds that are right at home in very dense vegetation near water. They are shaped kind of like small herons crossed with chickens. The clapper rail is found only along the Atlantic coast. It used to... Continue Reading →

White-eyed Vireo

Hey guys, welcome back! Today is our latest vireo species! The white-eyed vireo is one of the less common of the eastern vireos. They're cool looking little birds. They have a gray head, yellow mask and belly, and green back. And of course, white eyes. The white-eyed vireo breeds in the eastern part of the... Continue Reading →

Spotted Sandpiper

Hey guys, welcome back. Today's bird is the most widespread breeding shorebird in North America; the spotted sandpiper! Found in every part of the lower 48 states, as well as most of Canada and Alaska, the spotted sandpiper is one of the easiest shorebirds to ID. They are brown above, and white below with an... Continue Reading →

Cattle Egret

Hey guys welcome back. Like the western tanager from a few posts back, today's bird was a vagrant. The cattle egret is a small white heron that was originally found only in Africa before finding its way to North America in the 1950s. From there it spread its range, filling the southern half of the... Continue Reading →

Red-throated Loon

Hey guys, welcome back. Today's bird is the red-throated loon. The smallest of North America's loons, the red-throated loon is a winter resident of the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, only coming inland in the US during migration, and then only visiting the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River. They breed throughout northern Canada and Alaska... Continue Reading →

Wilson’s Snipe

Hey guys, welcome back. Today we have a funny little shorebird, the Wilson's snipe. This bird is very similar to the American woodcock we did waaaaay back at the beginning of this blog. The two look very similar, though the Wilson's snipe does spend a little more time in more traditional shorebird habitat than the... Continue Reading →

Red-necked Grebe

Hey guys, welcome back. Today is the red-necked grebe. These birds are not found in many parts of the US. Typically only along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts in winter, and pockets of the northeast during migration. Though a small number of them breed in the extreme norther plains state, most of them are found... Continue Reading →

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