Bay-breasted Warbler

Hey guys, welcome back! Today is a warbler that is unique in its appearance, making it one of the easiest to ID....in spring that is. Fall is a whole other story. In spring, the bay-breasted is a unique mix of gray, black, cream, and red-brown. No other warbler shares a color scheme like this. In... Continue Reading →

Solitary Sandpiper

Hey guys, welcome back. Back to shorebirds today for the solitary sandpiper. As its name suggests, the solitary sandpiper is often seen alone. They are a medium-sized shorebird, about the size of a robin, but taller. They sport a distinctive eye-ring, have an olive-brown head and upperparts, with some mottling of white, and have a... Continue Reading →

Blackburnian Warbler

Hey guys, welcome back. Today a truly awesome looking bird, the blackburnian warbler. An eastern warbler, the blackburnian is found pretty much only in the eastern half of the US during migration. They only breed in the northeast, and the upper elevations of the Appalachians. As well as southeastern Canada. Their backs are black and... Continue Reading →

Yellow-throated Vireo

Hey guys welcome back. Today we have another vireo species; the yellow-throated vireo. The yellow-throated vireo is pretty typical of a vireo species. They're warbler-like, but slightly large, and slightly slower. The yellow-throated is a mostly gray bird with darker gray wings, and a white wing bar. They have a dark yellow head, and a... Continue Reading →

Great Cormorant

Hey guys, welcome back. Today is the great cormorant, our second cormorant species. Great cormorants look similar to the more abundant double-crested variety, but are noticeably larger and bulkier looking. They have a white patch at the base of their bill, and a white patch on their flanks, under the wing that's typically only visible... Continue Reading →

Common Merganser

Hey guys, welcome back! Today, we complete our merganser trifecta! The third and last of the North American mergansers we get to explore is the common merganser. Despite its name, it's the merganser I've seen least. Central Park was filled with hooded mergansers every winter, and I've seen red-breasted mergansers by the hundreds on Lake... Continue Reading →

Sharp-shinned Hawk

Hey guys, welcome back. Today, the tiny terror that is the sharp-shinned hawk. The sharp-shinned hawk is the smallest North American hawk on average, with smaller males about the size of a mourning dove, but with a longer wingspan. Adults have a steel gray back with a barred orangish breast. Juveniles like the one pictured... Continue Reading →

Greater Scaup

Hey guys, welcome back. Sticking with waterfowl today, we have another diving duck; the greater scaup. One of two scaup species in North America (the other is the lesser), greater scaup are diving ducks of the same genus as the redhead, ring-necked duck, and canvasback from the last post. They look extremely similar to the... Continue Reading →

Canvasback

Hey guys, welcome back! Today we have a large diving duck known as the canvasback. Canvasback males have a similar color palette as the redhead; reddish-brown head, black breast, light gray almost white body, but the canvasback is larger and has a black bill. Females are a pale brown-gray. The thing that sets the canvasback... Continue Reading →

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