American Wigeon

Hey guys, welcome back! Today we dive back into the world of ducks. Well, more technically we're dabbling in the world of ducks. The American wigeon is a dabbling duck with a compact frame, and small bill that it uses for snipping vegetation. The female is a warm brown with a dark smudgy area around... Continue Reading →

Pileated Woodpecker

Hey guys welcome back! Today the largest woodpecker in North America, the pileated woodpecker! A couple of you may argue that, as the ivory-billed woodpecker is larger, and thought to be extinct, although there were supposed sightings of one in 2005. But we aren't here to go down that rabbit hole. If anyone is interested... Continue Reading →

Gray-cheeked Thrush

Hey guys, welcome back. Today, we head back to the thrush family and the drabbest of the bunch, the gray-cheeked thrush. Similar in look and behavior to a number of species we've already talked about including Swainson's thrush, hermit thrush, and veery, the gray-cheeked lacks any of the warm brown that its cousins have. Even... Continue Reading →

Bobolink

Hey guys, welcome back! And Happy St. Patrick's Day if you celebrate that. Today is an interesting little bird; the bobolink. Like its relatives, the blackbirds, the bobolink is found in tall grass areas, often near water. The breeding plumage of the male is a unique pattern of black and white, with the white patches... Continue Reading →

Osprey

Hey guys, welcome back. The osprey. A bird of prey that is unique among North American raptors. Although in the same order as a number of hawks, the osprey is the lone species in its genus...sort of. As I've mentioned numerous times, taxonomy is a complicated thing. There isn't one taxonomy that everyone follows. There's... Continue Reading →

Worm-eating Warbler

Hey guys, welcome back. Cornell describes today's bird as "drab, but elegantly marked" and that's certainly a good way to put it. The worm-eating warbler is a small warbler that is an olive brown, with a slightly yellower head. They have four bold black stripes on their head. These are warblers that are not quite... Continue Reading →

Monk Parakeet

Hey guys, welcome back! Today is our first parrot. That's right, parrot. The monk parakeet is not native to the US. Some of you may be thinking there's no parrots native to the US. Well, there are. Very few, and mostly just stragglers that wander north from Mexico and Central America. The eastern US actually... Continue Reading →

Least Flycatcher

Hey guys, welcome back. Today we venture bak into the confusing world of flycatchers, specifically the genus Empidonax which has the majority of nearly identical species. The least flycatcher certainly fits into that category, but is actually easier to tell apart than, say, an alder flycatcher from a willow flycatcher. First off, as their name... Continue Reading →

Yellow-crowned Night Heron

Hey guys, welcome back. Today, the yellow-crowned night heron. Unlike it's black-crowned cousin, which we talked about a while back, the yellow-crowned prefers salt and brackish waters. As such, they are found along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, although their breeding range does extend inland throughout the Mississippi River Valley up to around St. Louis,... Continue Reading →

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