Red-breasted Nuthatch

Hey guys, welcome back! We got ourselves a nuthatch today! The red-breasted nuthatch is the second of two eastern species of nuthatch (there's more out west which hopefully will be added to my list some day.) They are actually found throughout North America including 49 of the 50 states (sorry Hawaii) and are more common... Continue Reading →

Cape May Warbler

Hey guys, welcome back. Today's bird is the Cape May warbler. This warbler is unique amongst its warbler cousins in a couple ways. First up is its appearance. Breeding birds are an assortment of colors and patterns. They sport a green back, yellow belly covered in thin dark streaks, and their yellow face has an... Continue Reading →

Clay-colored Sparrow

Hey guys, welcome back. Today we venture back to the sparrow family for a sparrow that is a bit tricky to ID, especially if you don't see them that often; the clay-colored sparrow! Their normal range goes right down the center of the country, throughout the Great Plains, while breeding throughout southern Canada. They are... Continue Reading →

Philadelphia Vireo

Hey guys, welcome back. Today is a vireo often overlooked; the Philadelphia vireo. The Philadelphia vireo can be a tricky ID. It looks very similar to the warbling vireo, but with slightly more contrast in the face stripes (though not as much as the red-eyed vireo.) The key feature is its yellow breast. Although sometimes... Continue Reading →

Northern Harrier

Hey guys welcome back. Today is a cool raptor, the norther harrier. Northern harriers kind of look like a cross between an owl and a hawk. They are hawks, in the same family as the Cooper's and Sharp-shinned we've covered in the past. But get a close look at their face and you'll see a... Continue Reading →

Yellow-breasted Chat

Hey guys, welcome back. Today is a strange bird, the yellow-breasted chat. Well, strange in a taxonomic way. The yellow-breasted chat was always a bird without a home; not quite fitting in with any other families. For many years, it was actually in the warbler family despite being much larger, and not really sharing a... Continue Reading →

Bank Swallow

Hey guys, welcome back. Today, the only swallow species I've seen (to date) that I've only seen in Ohio; the bank swallow. Like all swallows, the bank swallow is a fast, agile, and very aerobatic flier. This can make trying to ID one in flight rather difficult. I hadn't yet moved back to Ohio, but... Continue Reading →

Olive-sided Flycatcher

Hey guys, welcome back. Ahhh, the world of flycatchers. I've said it before, and I'll say it again, flycatchers are tricky. Luckily, today's flycatcher is one of the easier ones to ID. The olive-sided flycatcher most closely resembles the wood-pewee, and is actually the largest member of the pewee family. They are mostly gray birds,... Continue Reading →

Common Nighthawk

Hey guys, welcome back. Last time, we did a swallow, and I said today's bird would share some things with swallows. Well, that's true. The common nighthawk has long, pointed wings, and hunts for insects in the air just like swallows. But that's about where the similarities end. Nighthawks are in the nightjar family, along... Continue Reading →

Purple Martin

Hey guys, welcome back. Today we have the largest member of the swallow family in North America, the purple martin! Perhaps best known as residents of bird condos throughout the US, the gourd shaped nest houses have recently begun to replace traditional style bird condos. Actually, the gourd style isn't new. Native Americans used hollowed... Continue Reading →

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